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Journey author Robert Davis is the owner and creative director of Atlanta agency, Davis Advertising, Inc.

 

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Journey from Concept to Creation

There is far more to the creative process than learning how to use software and configure hardware. This blog addresses them.

The objective.

Only published comments... Aug 01 2006, 07:40 PM by Adman
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 Before you get started on a journey, it is always a good idea to know where you are going, how far your destination is, and how long it will take to get there. Our creative journey is no exception. So, the next step in our journey is to determine the objective(s) of the creative work. But, before we can determine the objective, we need to know precisely what an objective is.  Not to worry, I will 'splain it for you. First, as you might have surmised, an objective is not an objective at all unless it contains all three parts of an objective. It ain’t an objective 'till it's an objective (I’m practicing my Yogi Berra imitation). Anyway, this was drilled into my head in business school…so now I am going to drill it into your head -- fair is fair.

 The first part of an objective is the “factor” that you want to influence. While this usually involves sales of widgets, this could involve a great number of things. You might want to sell Japanese kitchen knives that never need sharpening… garnish a bigger market share -- or really important stuff like help women to get unbreakable nails. Or, you might be trying to get people to quit smoking… get rid of “love handles…” lose 300 lbs in six weeks… grow more hair… get washboard abs (like mine)… get greener grass… or just create a “warm and fuzzy” feeling about a company via their corporate video.

 But no matter what the factor is that you want to influence, it cannot be a real objective unless it also contains the second part -- the degree of influence. This might be expressed as a percentage, a dollar amount, or some other measurable factor such as the "warm & fuzziness" factor or something. It can be determined by using break-even point analysis, previous year company and/or industry sales and market share data, or polling and marketing research.

 I know the suspense is killing you so here is the third component -- the time frame. If you do not have a time frame for achieving your objective, guess what... it ain't an objective. Of course different factors will obviously require different time frames. It takes longer, for example, to change prevailing negative attitudes than to generate traffic to a web site or to equip every home with one of those cool Japanese kitchen knives that'll cut right through tin cans and then slice tomatoes "paper thin."

   In addition to having all three parts, the objective must be specific, workable, measurable, and attainable... and challenging. It is futile to have an objective that cannot be achieved... it is also rather lame to have an objective that is too easy to achieve.

   Having a proper written objective that is agreed upon by all parties in advance of implementation is important... if for no other reason than the fact that you cannot measure success or failure without a "measuring stick." Some factors are, of course, more easily measured than others. For example, web site hits, retail store traffic and sales of nail polish are relatively easy to measure, while brand image and awareness are more difficult; sometimes requiring extensive polling and other market research. In all cases, having a written objective provides the benchmark for measuring success or failure of the creative effort.

Comments

 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

I was honored to serve as the final judge in the 2008 DECA, International Career Development Conference

August 14, 2008 4:00 AM
 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

<< Previous | Next >> The next question that needs to be addressed is how the client’s

December 5, 2008 7:08 PM
 

Strategy. - Journey from Concept to Creation said:

Pingback from  Strategy. - Journey from Concept to Creation

December 5, 2008 7:16 PM
 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

<< Previous | Next >> The fourth graphic design principle I will write about is the principle

December 6, 2008 2:58 AM
 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

<< Previous | Next >> I was honored to serve as the final judge in the 2008 DECA, International

December 16, 2008 4:06 PM
 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

<< Previous | Next >> The fourth graphic design principle I will write about is the principle

July 11, 2011 7:04 PM
 

Journey from Concept to Creation said:

<< Previous | Next >> I was honored to serve as the final judge in the 2008 DECA, International

July 21, 2014 3:26 PM

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About Adman

After developing his artistic abilities from an early age, Robert Davis (Adman) started his advertising career as a graphic artist for a commercial printing company while in 10th grade. He later acquired degrees in Commercial Art and (later) Business Administration (Marketing with focus on computer science) while working in various advertising agency capacities. Robert started his own agency in 1989. He added an in-house Pro Tools® recording studio in 1999 and an Avid Xpress® DV video editing suite in 2002. He now also has two Avid Media Composer suites and an Xpress Studio HD suite in a fully equipped studio which also features SoftImage|XSI and Pro Tools. He believes that his company, Davis Advertising, Inc., represents a new model for the 21st century advertising agency…”a small, agile and responsive agency wit1h comprehensive, in-house capabilities.” He says, “Avid® software provides the creative freedom and flexibility I covet.” His focus is on developing effective creative ideas via his own strategic planning process. He loves being surrounded by cameras, lights, props and other creative professionals who share his vision. He also, of course, loves working with Avid® software to bring his ideas to life. Currently residing in metro-Atlanta, Robert is an accomplished writer, producer and creative director. His advertising agency has served Fortune 500 accounts and has received several international awards. His work has been exhibited at the prestigious Cannes Lions Advertising Festival. When not riding his vintage Italian racing bike, or working out with free weights, Robert can often be found in the late evening singing or playing drums, guitars and keyboards in the studio.

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